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understanding of the Internet of Things

- May 15, 2018 -

Look at these five points for the understanding and understanding of the Internet of Things, simply subvert your imagination


Introduction: ABI Research’s research shows that the country’s IoT service revenue growth is higher than any other big country and will exceed US$41 billion by 2020. Do you know and understand the Internet of Things? The next Xiaobian will take you to understand the true face of the Internet of Things.

ABI Research’s research shows that the country’s IoT service revenue growth is higher than any other large country and will exceed US$41 billion by 2020. Do you know and understand the Internet of Things? The next Xiaobian will take you to understand the true face of the Internet of Things.

About the Internet of Things's predictions and viewpoints

We may have heard the prediction that the Internet of Things will become an irresistible trend by 2050 with countless items and countless funds. However, Gartner predicts that the use of global "things" will reach 25 billion in 2020. People have already begun to pay close attention to the opportunities and challenges brought by the progress of the Internet of Things.

But with these predictions alone, you cannot see the full story. To truly unlock the potential of the Internet of Things, you must overcome the data challenge, which is more important than solving the "object" problem itself.

Look at these five points for the understanding and understanding of the Internet of Things, simply subvert your imagination

The best example of such a challenge is the "last mile" data problem, such as how to extract data from a device or a remote platform, and how to interpret data analysis to increase productivity and achieve maximum performance. Whether it is a connected home or an industrial-level solution, after collecting data, people often find it difficult to display the information in the data and explore it in an easy-to-use way.

For the Internet of Things, to actually see the data, interact with the data

Recall Steve? Jobs first introduced the iPhone. He provided a reason for using large-size touchscreens: each application requires its own user interface. Similar reasons apply to analysis.

Each data problem we propose requires its own charting and visualization perspective; the sensor data that form the basis of the Internet of Things is showing an explosive growth trend, and it requires more different charts and perspectives. Unfortunately, most IoT applications use a static view, or "closed-end dashboard." In addition to answering a set of predetermined questions, they have no other purpose.

The flexibility of these tools is far from sufficient to meet the needs of users. "Rigability" is crucial to the value of IoT data. For example, you may be able to use an IoT application's fault engine data to predict the frequency and type of future failures. But what if you want to see the specific part that failed? To answer this very natural follow-up question, interactivity and sharing ability are of utmost importance.

Ideally, users and data - and other data explorers - engage in a free and in-depth dialogue, so that everyone can find the arrangement and mode of change.

In the Internet of Things, the combination can improve data quality

Closely related to these deep issues is the second key to the success of the Internet of Things: Integration. Interactive data analysis can provide answers, and the combination of Internet of Things data and other contextual information can also provide answers.

We start with a consumer example, for example, by combining Fitbit data to explore potential associations between fitness programs and sleep patterns.

Now imagine looking for enterprise-level insights by mixing different data. Embedded sensors in the jet engine help predict when the engine needs maintenance. It can prevent breakdowns, save billions of dollars in funding, and even save lives. When combined with other information, it can also help us make better budget decisions for each product or region.